Ali Saedvandi, PhD, FRM, MBA

International banking expert
Investment consultant
Macroeconomics policy advisor
Finance professional
  • Management banking experience, Citibank
    Macroeconomics policy making advisor: money, capital, and foreign exchange markets; monetary and fiscal policies
    Banking strategic management expert
    FRM holder
    Consultant to corporations: finance, budget, investment
    Mentor to Fintechs
    Ten years of teaching and research experience in banking and finance, University of Wollongong in Dubai
    VP, Structured lending specialist, Citibank
    VP, Senior portfolio specialist, Citibank

Ali Saedvandi, PhD, FRM, MBA

Dr. Ali Saedvandi is an international banking expert, macroeconomics policy advisor, investment consultant, and finance professional. He obtains more than ten years of teaching and research experience as assistant professor of banking and finance at the University of Wollongong in Dubai. Ali developed and delivered fifteen postgraduate and undergraduate finance and macroeconomics courses including four advanced banking subjects, namely Banking Theory and Practice, Banks’ Lending and Securities, and International Banking, and Financial Risk Management. The excellent class evaluations from his students, further evidence the high quality of Ali’s teaching skills.

Prior to the academic position, he worked at Citi Private Bank, as Vice President, Structured Lending Specialist. Ali’s key focus was to develop a lending program against GCC local securities. His duty was to orchestrate different activities inside and outside of the bank including internal and external legal affairs, compliance, credit control and services, technology, and structured lending.  He also worked at Citi Private Bank as Senior Portfolio Analyst. In that capacity, he prepared several materials including the Investment Themes Book.

Before joining the Citi Private Bank, Ali worked for Nikan Capital as head of Research and Asset Management divisions. His main responsibilities included development of new marketable investment products.

Dr. Saedvandi has taught courses in Banking, Investment, Risk Management, Derivatives, and Project Appraisal at both undergraduate and graduate levels. He developed executive courses of Banking Risk Management, too. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics and two masters degrees in Economics and Systems Engineering. He received his MBA, Finance from Virginia Tech and His B.S in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Sharif University of Technology. He is an FRM-holder since 2012.

Education

B.S. Industrial and Systems Engineering

Sharif University of Technology

M.S. Systems Engineering

Institute for Research in Planning and Development

M.A. Economics

 Virginia Tech

MBA Finance

Virginia Tech

Focused on Financial Risk Management

Ph.D. Economics

 Tarbiat Modares University

Dissertation: The Determinants of the Depreciation Function in Modern Growth Theory

Professional Experience

1

Assistant Professor of Banking and Finance, 2008- 2018, University of Wollongong in Dubai

Teaching Postgraduate Banking and Finance

Teaching MBA Macroeconomics

Teaching Undergraduate Banking and Finance

Organized and conducted certification program in Banking Risk Management

Service

Education Committee: elected as representative of College of Business

2

Structured Lending Specialist Vice President, Sep 2006- Sep 2008 Citibank, Dubai, UAE

Responsible for establishment of a new margin lending program for GCC equities
Carried on research on GCC economies, stock exchanges, and single equities
Analyzed portfolios of hedge funds for the purpose of extending margin finance
Followed up Islamic finance cases

3

Senior Portfolio Specialist Vice President, Sep 2006-Aug 2007 Citibank, Dubai, UAE

Provided analysis and advice on hedge funds and private equity funds
Implemented “Themes 2007” for CPB ME including five themes
Prepared account reviews and reallocations for clients and investment proposals for prospects. AUM: $300 million
Organized a variety of sales decks such as “Real Estates Investment Opportunities” and “CR China Real Estate Fund”
Implemented research on the Japanese economic outlook and recommended Japanese funds through searching and programming in Excel linked with Bloomberg
Middle East News, weekly business newsletter issued to bankers and counselors

4

Head of Research Group and Faculty Member, Jan 2005- Sep 2006, IIES, Tehran, Iran

  • Concentrated on “Estimation of Crude Oil Term Structure Models” as the main subject of research
    Managed research group of “Project Appraisal and Risk Management for Oil and Gas Sectors.”
    Supervised two full-time researchers
    Prepared four training packages in the areas of risk management, financial project appraisal, decision-making and portfolio management

5

Head of Asset Management and Research Group, 2004, Nikan Capital, Tehran, Iran

Supervised two full-time and two part-time analysts in this Iranian private investment company
Provided periodical reports on Tehran Stock Exchange, including Nikan Capital’s technical and fundamental analyses
Prepared three investment packages for clients with different risk tolerances: Conservative, Moderate, and Aggressive

6

Head of Master Plan Group (part-time), Sep 2004-Sep 2006, Kherad Pirooz (an affiliate of Parsian Bank), Tehran, Iran

Oversaw five specialists with concentrations of branch operations, IT, budgeting and planning, human resources, and international trade in this largest privately-owned bank in Iran with respect to sales
Prepared the As-Is phase of the bank’s Master Plan

Professional Certificates

Summer Institute in Law and Economics

University of Chicago, Law School, 2014 & 2016

Financial Risk Management (FRM) Charter holder

Global Association of Risk Professionals

Summer Method School in Econometrics

 London School of Economics

Intensive course on Macroeconomic Coordination and Externalities

17th Trento Summer School, Italy, 2016

Econometrics Summer School

University of Cambridge, UK, 2014

Case Writing and Teaching Certificate

Ivey Business School, 2010

Risk Management

DNV Certificate, 2005

Equity Certificate

Bloomberg, 2007

University Learning and Teaching Certificate,

UOWD, 2009

 Teaching

Banking Risk Management

Program Overview
This program is designed for:
This professional program is designed for students whose ambition is to grasp the fundamental concepts of financial risk management. The program is aimed at providing those currently employed by banks or desire to attend banks to develop key competencies and skills in detecting and managing a wide range of risks involved in financial institutions. This program is also suitable for supervisory and governmental bodies.

Program Structure

Topics covered in Autumn semester 2010
Foundations of Risk Management 20%
Quantitative Analysis 20%
Financial Markets and Products 30%
Valuation and Risk Models 30%

Topics covered in Spring semester 2011
Market Risk Measurement and Management 25%
Credit Risk Measurement and Management 25%
Operational and Integrated Risk Management 25%
Risk Management and Investment Management 15%
Current Issues in Financial Markets 10%

Economic Analysis of Business

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION
TBS905 aims to introduce students to economic logic and concepts that are relevant to business and managerial functioning. The course will enhance students’ understanding of the subject and enable them to appreciate its practical relevance in the context of economic events and circumstances which influence the operations of business.

After imparting an initial grounding in (microeconomic) theory dealing with the behavior of individual economic and production units, the subject will progress to a comprehensive treatment of macroeconomics and its application to the functioning of the economy overall. The treatment of the subject of macroeconomics is situated in an open economy context, which is most appropriate in a world of globalisation and disappearing national economic boundaries.

It is a course objective to equip students to be able to read and understand published articles on business and the broader economy, and interpret these as to their impact on business and government organisations and such material will be used in class. Students are strongly encouraged to regularly read at least one recognised financial newspaper and seek to relate their study of macroeconomics in the classroom to practical economic problems in the real world. Such constant practice of “being a macroeconomist” will enable them to imbibe the principles of economics better and allow them the facility of analyzing economic problems from the perspective of an economist.

Assessment will be designed to assess students’ understanding of the topic as shown by their ability to use, explain and demonstrate the concepts embodied in the subject and will include a group presentation, a mid-session and a final examination

LEARNING OUTCOMES
It is an objective of the subject to equip students with the knowledge and approach to be able to understand the impacts on business of the events of the economic environment in which businesses operate. At the completion of this subject, students should therefore achieve the following competencies:

1. The student would be able to identify and describe the important macroeconomic issues facing modern economies of the world including that of the UAE.
2. With the skills developed, students would be better able to describe and interpret the macroeconomic problems facing economies
3. With a basic grounding in economic and exposure to macroeconomics theory, students would be in a position to apply these to current economic issues.
4. The exposure to macroeconomic theory and its applications will enable students to explain economic problem from an analytical perspective. This should lead students to meaningfully analysing macroeconomic phenomena.
5. Students should be able to assess and evaluate macroeconomics policies that have been employed as well as likely policies that may be introduced.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Mankiw, N. Gregory 2007, Macroeconomics (6th Edition), Worth Publishers.

RECOMMENDED READINGS
Mankiw, N.G. (2004) Principles of Macroeconomics (3rd edition), Thomson, South-Western, United States.

Dornbusch, R., P. Bodman, M. Crosby, S. Fischer and R. Startz (2002) Macroeconomics, McGraw-Hill, Sydney.

Fernandes, C. and A. Karnik (2006) Macroeconometric Modelling For An Oil Dependent Economy: An Instruments-Targets Approach, Dubai: Research Unit, University of Wollongong in Dubai.

Hall, R.E. and H.D. Papeel (2005) Macroeconomics: Economic Growth, Fluctuations, And Policy (6th edition), New York: W.W. Norton.

Gans, J., S. King and N.G. Mankiw (1999) Principles of Microeconomics, Harcourt Brace, Marrickville.

McTaggart, D., C. Findlay and M. Parkin (2003) Economics (4th edition), Pearson Education, Australia, Sydney

Slavin, S. L. (2005) Economics (7th edition), McGraw-Hill Irwin, New York (extract on inflation)

Pindyck R.S. & D. L. Rubinfeld, (2005) Microeconomics (6th Edition), International Student Edition, Prentice Hall.

Periodicals should be consulted for latest developments in international economics, including:

Central Bank of UAE website
• Economist
• Financial Times
• Harvard Business Review (HBR)
• Fortune
• Far Eastern Economic Review

Financial Strategy

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION

This subject develops the knowledge necessary to evaluate the set of theories that constitute modern corporate finance and how these theories can be applied to corporate financial strategies.

A finance executive plays a key role in the development of a company’s strategic plan. In particular s/he has the responsibility of providing advice on financing, investment and payout policies to be pursued by a company in order to maximize shareholders’ wealth. In view of increased application of mergers and acquisitions as a growth strategy, S/he has to play a key role in valuation and pricing of deals and evaluating the impact of such policy on shareholders’ wealth. Finance executive has also an essential function of analyzing risk involved in financial transactions and to hedge such risks. It is the aim of this course to examine many of these issues.

 LEARNING OUTCOMES

On successful completion of this subject, the student should be able to:
1. Relate and examine the role of the financial manager.
2. Explain the key concepts of investment decision, finance decision and dividend decision.
3. Scrutinize the concepts of risk and diversification.
4. Examine the role of financial markets, the concepts of debt and equity and corporate structure.
5. Justify and analyze decisions on financial investment and company restructuring.
6. Appraise the role of derivatives and multinational finance.

REQUIRED TEXTS

Brealey, Myers, and Allen (2011), Principles Corporate Finance. McGraw Hill,

RECOMMENDED READINGS
1. Brigham E.F. and Ehrhardt M.C., (2005) Financial Management : Theory and Practice 11th
2. Edn, South Western.
3. Damodaran A., (2001) Corporate Finance: Theory and Practice, 2nd Edition , Wiley Higher
4. Education
5. Peirson G. et al , (2012) Business Finance , 11th Edn. McGraw Hill Australia
6. Ross S.A., Westerfield R.W., Jaffe J. and Jordan B.D., (2008) Modern Financial Management, 8thEdn. McGraw Hill.
7. Van Horne J.C.,(2002) Financial Management and Policy , 12th Edition, Prentice Hall

International Financial Management

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION

This subject introduces students to the financial management disciplines used within a multinational firm, and the interaction between firms and financial markets.
Topics covered include: overview of financial markets and instruments; global financial system architecture; foreign exchange and derivatives markets; operational and financial risk management employed within a multinational context; financing of trade and foreign direct investments; working capital management and investment decision making within multinational firms; reporting and performance analysis; techniques for appraising capital investments (incorporating idiosyncratic/country risks); corporate governance and valuation implications; taxation and regulatory impacts; corporate control transactions and restructuring.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On successful completion of this subject, students will demonstrate an understanding of the financial challenges faced by organizations operating in an international environment, and the financial decision making processes which are employed to evaluate and manage investments in this challenging environment.
For students, the learning objectives enable them to:

1. Evaluate and apply fundamental accounting and financial management concepts;
2. Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of frameworks and disciplines used to formulate financial strategies and policies;
3. Apply these techniques and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the interactions between financial management and the other functions in an organization;
4. Discuss the principal drivers of value-maximization and security valuation processes;
5. Identify and describe capital markets and financial innovations.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Hirt G.A, Block S. B. & Danielsen B. R., Corporate Finance Foundations, 15th Edition, Global Edition, 2014, ISBN-139780077161194, McGraw-Hill.

RECOMMENDED READINGS

1. Brigham, E.F. and Houston, J.F., 2004, Concise 4th Edition, Fundamentals of
Financial Management, Thomson South-Western.
2. Shapiro, A.C., 2002, Foundations of Multinational Financial Management, International 4th Edition, Wiley.
3. Shapiro, A.C., 2003, 7th Edition, Multinational Financial Management, Wiley.

Introductory Business Finance

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION

This subject provides an introduction to business finance. It includes a critical examination of the theory and practice of corporate financial management, including the capital structure decision, the capital acquisition/disbursement decision, and the investment decision for both current and long term assets. The main focus is on financial decision making, with consideration of risk and returns a fundamental consideration.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon successful completion of this subject, a student should be able to:

• value projected cash flow streams such as loans, debentures, equity investments, and other contracts.
• model and solve short-term and long-term capital investment decision problems.
• identify and make allowance for the relationship exhibited by financial markets between risk and return.
• identify and measure the costs to the firm of different forms of debt and equity capital.
• evaluate the dividend and financial leverage policies of individual firms.
• explain lucidly and succinctly selected concepts and tools of corporate finance.

REQUIRED TEXTS

Ross, S., Westerfield, R., & Jordan, B. (2008), Corporate Finance: Fundamentals: 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill
ISBN: 978-0-07-128563-6

RECOMMENDED READINGS

Brigham, Eugene F. (1999), Financial Management: Theory & Practice 11th Edition.
Thomson South-Western (ISBN: 9780324224993)

Gitman, L, R. Juchau, J. Flanagan (2008), Principles of Managerial Finance 4th Edition. Pearson/Addison Wesley.

Keown, Arthur, J. (2005), Financial Management: Principles and Applications 10th Edition. Pearson Prentice-Hall (ISBN: 0131450654)

Petty, Williams, J. (2003), Financial Management 3rd Edition. Prentice-Hall.
(ISBN: 1740097874)

Financial Statements Analysis

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION
FIN 324 develops knowledge and skills in the principles and techniques of analysis of accounting information contained in financial statements. The emphasis is on practical application of these skills. The subject introduces the language and concepts of financial information analysis, and examines the role of financial information analysis within a framework of overall business analysis. The course applies the techniques of financial information analysis to specific areas of business analysis that are commonly met in practice. The subject explores the varied sources of financial information used in developing financial analyses of firms. The financial information considered in this course is primarily publicly available accounting information, although other sources of information relied on in corporate financial analysis are also taken into account.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon successful completion of this subject students should have sufficient theoretical understanding and analytical skills to:

1. Describe and discuss the main steps in business analysis and valuation using financial statements.
2. Enumerate and discuss the major applications of business financial analysis
3. Evaluate firms on the basis of available financial information.
4. Assess the relevance, reliability and general quality of financial information available in given contexts.
5. Model and allow for the incentives underlying the supply and demand for financial information.
6. Comprehend the reaction of equity and debt markets to the release of particular financial information.
7. Model the investment decisions of equity market participants and corporate lenders, and their consequent financial information requirements.
8. Have knowledge of properties of financial statement numbers.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Palepu, Krishna G., Paul M. Healy, Victor L. Bernard, and Eric Peek, Business Analysis & Valuation, IFRS 2nd Edition, Thomson, 2010.

RECOMMENDED READINGS
1. Fraser, Lyn M. and Aileen Ormiston, Understanding Financial Statements, 7th Edition, Pearson, 2004.
2. Gibson, Charles H., Financial Statement Analysis: Using Financial Accounting Information, South-Western, 1998.
3. Milton, Q., Accounting: Building Business Skills, John Wiley & Sons, 2003.
4. Palepu, Krishna G., Paul M. Healy, and Victor L. Bernard, Business Analysis & Valuation: Using Financial Statements, 4rd Edition, Thomson, 2008.
5. Penman, Stephen H., Financial Statement Analysis and Security Valuation, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2007.
6. Schilit, Howard, Financial Shenanigans: How to Detect Gimmicks & Fraud in Financial Reports, 2nd Edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2002.
7. Subramanyam, K. R. and J. Wild, Financial Statement Analysis, 10th Edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2009.
8. Wild, John J., Financial Statement Analysis, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2003.

Financial Statements Analysis

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION
FIN 324 develops knowledge and skills in the principles and techniques of analysis of accounting information contained in financial statements. The emphasis is on practical application of these skills. The subject introduces the language and concepts of financial information analysis, and examines the role of financial information analysis within a framework of overall business analysis. The course applies the techniques of financial information analysis to specific areas of business analysis that are commonly met in practice. The subject explores the varied sources of financial information used in developing financial analyses of firms. The financial information considered in this course is primarily publicly available accounting information, although other sources of information relied on in corporate financial analysis are also taken into account.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon successful completion of this subject students should have sufficient theoretical understanding and analytical skills to:

1. Describe and discuss the main steps in business analysis and valuation using financial statements.
2. Enumerate and discuss the major applications of business financial analysis
3. Evaluate firms on the basis of available financial information.
4. Assess the relevance, reliability and general quality of financial information available in given contexts.
5. Model and allow for the incentives underlying the supply and demand for financial information.
6. Comprehend the reaction of equity and debt markets to the release of particular financial information.
7. Model the investment decisions of equity market participants and corporate lenders, and their consequent financial information requirements.
8. Have knowledge of properties of financial statement numbers.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Palepu, Krishna G., Paul M. Healy, Victor L. Bernard, and Eric Peek, Business Analysis & Valuation, IFRS 2nd Edition, Thomson, 2010.

RECOMMENDED READINGS
1. Fraser, Lyn M. and Aileen Ormiston, Understanding Financial Statements, 7th Edition, Pearson, 2004.
2. Gibson, Charles H., Financial Statement Analysis: Using Financial Accounting Information, South-Western, 1998.
3. Milton, Q., Accounting: Building Business Skills, John Wiley & Sons, 2003.
4. Palepu, Krishna G., Paul M. Healy, and Victor L. Bernard, Business Analysis & Valuation: Using Financial Statements, 4rd Edition, Thomson, 2008.
5. Penman, Stephen H., Financial Statement Analysis and Security Valuation, 3rd Edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2007.
6. Schilit, Howard, Financial Shenanigans: How to Detect Gimmicks & Fraud in Financial Reports, 2nd Edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2002.
7. Subramanyam, K. R. and J. Wild, Financial Statement Analysis, 10th Edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2009.
8. Wild, John J., Financial Statement Analysis, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill Irwin, 2003.

8

Bank Management

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION

Bank management is a comprehensive subject in banking that integrates with both the finance and accounting specializations within the School of Business. It combines information on the management practices and operation of banks. The subject involves in depth discussions and analysis of banking issues such as lending, banking interest rate models, technology, foreign exchange, sovereign, liability & liquidity risks management and capital adequacy, within the international banking framework.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

Upon successful completion of this subject, a student should be able to:
1. Evaluate the role of modern banks within the Australian and International context.
2. Explain key functions of banks with a particular emphasis on the management of lending practices, credit risk, specific markets for bank loans and inter-bank relationships.
3. Design and plan an appropriate bank lending submission.
4. Describe regulatory frameworks and their impact upon the banking environment.
5. Critically evaluate the banking environment: explain the implications of social, economic and political factors within the banking framework.
6. Evaluate interest risk models: maturity, duration and re-pricing models.
7. Demonstrate skills in the management of lending and credit risk.
8. Demonstrate an understanding of new developments in banking technology.

REQUIRED TEXT

Saunders, Anthony and Cornett, Marcia Millon, Financial Markets and Institutions, international 5th Edition, McGraw Hill, 2012.

RECOMMENDED READINGS

1. Bessis, Joel, Risk Management in Banking, 3rd edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2009.
2. Brown, A.J.F., et al., (1989), International Banking and Finance, Serendip Publications.
3. Choudhry, M., Bank Asset and Liability Management: Strategy, Trading and Analysis, 1st Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2007.
4. De Lucia, R.D. & J. Peters (1998), Commercial Bank Management Functions and Objectives, LBC Information Services.
5. Gup, B.E. et al., (2007), Commercial Banking: The Management of Risk, Wiley.
6. Hempel, George H. and Donald Simonson, Bank Management: Text and Cases, 4th Edition, John Wiley & Sons.
7. Hogan Warren, et al., Management of Financial Institutions, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons Australia, 2004.
8. Hull, John C., Risk Management and Financial Institutions, 3rd edition. Wiley & Sons, 2012.
9. Lang, H. , Saunders, A., and Cornett, Financial Institutions Management, 3rd Edition,McGraw Hill, Australia, 2013
10. Matten, C., Managing Bank Capital: Capital Allocation and Performance Measurement, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons.
11. Rose, Peter. S., Commercial Bank Management, 5th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2002.
12. Rose, Peter S. and Sylvia C. Hudgins, Bank Management and Financial Services, International 9th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2013.
13. Saunders, Anthony, Financial Institutions Management: A Modern Perspective, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill.
14. Saunders, Anthony and Cornett, Marcia Millon, Financial Institutions Management: A Risk Management Approach, international 7th Edition, McGraw Hill, 2011.
15. Weaver, P. M. & C. D. Kingsley, Banking and Lending Practice, 4th Edition, Law Book Company, A Thomson Company, 2001.

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION

This subject builds upon previous knowledge of domestic and corporate finance and extends into the international sphere. The subject explores the concepts and relationships linking international financial markets and the operations of Multinational corporations (MNC). The coverage introduces international financial market theory and covers issues including foreign exchange pricing, international financing decision, and foreign exchange and interest-rate risk management. It also covers methods of international trade and finance, as well as recognition of the place of the international financier in a changing world economy.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon completion of this subject students will be able to:
1. Explain the international financial environment.
2. Describe how foreign exchange markets operate.
3. Discuss the management of different types of foreign exchange exposure.
4. Identify various risks faced by multinational corporations (MNC’s).
5. Examine financial, ethical and social decisions facing firms in a global context.
6. Identify the role of international banking in multinational investment decisions.
7. Describe the strategic issues related to foreign investment decisions.
8. Discuss working capital management issues of multinational business.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Shapiro, Alan & Moles, Peter, International Financial Management, 10th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2014.

RECOMMENDED READINGS

1. Carbaugh, R., International Economics, Thomson, 2004.
2. Click, R. and Coval, J., The Theory and Practice of International Financial
Management, Prentice Hall, 2002.
3. Eun, Cheol S. and Resnick, Bruce G., International Financial Management, 4th
Edition, McGraw Hill, 2007.
4. Melvin, M., International Money and Finance, Addison-Wesley, 2000.
5. Moffett, Stonehill, and Eiteman, Fundamentals of Multinational Finance, 2nd
Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2006.
6. Moosa, I., International Finance: An Analytical Approach, McGraw-Hill, 2004.
7. Shapiro, Alan, Foundations of Multinational Financial Management, 5th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2005.
8. Stiglitz, Joseph, Globalization and its Discontents, Penguin Books, 2002.
9. Yarbrough, B. and Yarbrough, R., The World Economy: Trade and Finance, Thomson, 2003.

Financial Institutions

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION
This subject reviews the global financial system and investigates the functioning of financial institutions and markets. Particular content may include coverage of the evolution of the global monetary system and organizations; the international financial markets including Euromarkets; the framework of global financial system; the role of regulation sectors; the operations of money markets, capital markets and derivative markets; the banking industry and payment system; and the implication of monetary and fiscal policies on financial markets.

Learning Outcomes

1. Discuss the mechanics of key world organizations and monetary systems.
2. Appraise the effectiveness of the financial regulatory sectors in performance of their monitoring role.
3. Analyse the fundamentals of various financial intermediaries, instruments, markets and their interactions.
4. Evaluate government debt markets and reserve bank function.
5. Assess the banking industry and the payment systems.
6. Evaluate the impact of monetary and fiscal policies on financial markets and investor behaviours.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Kidwell, D.S., Brimble, M., Lenten, L., Docherty, P. and Mazzola, P. 2013, Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, 3rd Edition, Wiley. Hard copy or e-book are acceptable.

RECOMMENDED READINGS

• Viney, C., 2011, McGrath’s Financial Institutions, Instruments and Markets, 7th Edition, McGraw- Hill.
• Valentine, T. Ford, G. O’Hara, L. and Sundmacher, M., 2011, Fundamentals of Financial Markets and Institutions in Australia, 1st Edition, Pearson.
• Iqbal & Abbas. “An Introduction to Islamic Finance: Theory and Practice, 2011, WILEY, 2nd Edition, ISBN: 978-0-470-82808-3 (selected parts)
• Dahila, Wafik & Zamir, 2008, Diversity in the regulation of Islamic Financial Institutions, The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Volume 46, Issue 5, Pages 778–800.
• Yahia Abdul-Rehman, “The Art of Islamic Banking and Finance: Tools and Techniques for Community based banking” 2011, WILEY

Enterprise Risk Management

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION
The focus in this subject is on providing protection against portfolio, financial and corporate risks that are common to any number of basic and advanced investment decisions. Topics covered include risk insurance; the function of a risk management program to satisfy shareholders, employees, regulators, and other important stakeholders; the continuing evolution of best practice risk policies. methodologies and associated risk infrastructures; implementation and the efficient communication of an organisation-wide Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) approach that encompasses market, credit, liquidity, operational, legal and regulatory, business, strategic and reputational risks.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On successful completion of this subject, the student will be able to:

1) Justify why businesses need to undertake risk management and assess risk tolerances.
2) Derive an appropriate risk management practice for a business.
3) Identify the characteristics and discuss the strategies for management of major risks encountered in business.
4) Apply appropriate risk management standards to different businesses.
5) Explain orally and in writing the concepts of risk management.
6) Apply hedging to corporate and investment risks.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Fraser J, Simkins B., Enterprise Risk Management, Wiley 2011.
Required texts can be purchased from the University Bookshop.

RECOMMENDED READINGS
1) Evans J, Ganegodha A, Classification of risks and management implications, Risk Management Today, 2012.25
2) Corrigan J, Evans J, Ganegodha A, Dynamisms of risks and their risk management implications, Risk Management Today, 2013.36
3) Corrigan J, Evans J, Ganegodha A, Human capital & the dynamism of risks, Risk Management Today, 2014 . Vol 24 No 9
4) Ganegodha A, Evans J, A framework to manage the measurable, immeasurable and the unidentifiable financial risk, Australian Journal of Management, 2014, Vol. 39(1) 5 –34
5) Corrigan J, Allan N, Emerging Risk Assessment – Latest Practice and Innovations, Institute of Actuaries Summit May 2013
6) Jorion, Financial Risk Manager Handbook, Sixth (6th) Edition; Wiley Finance, 2011:
7) J. C. Hulll, 2009, 7th Edition, “Options, Futures and other Derivatives”, Prentice Hall.
8) Iqbal & Abbas. “An Introduction to Islamic Finance: Theory and Practice, 2011, WILEY, 2nd Edition, ISBN: 978-0-470-82808-3 (selected parts)
9) Sundararajan, V. ; Errico, Luca , 2002, “Islamic Financial Institutions and Products in the Global Financial System: Key Issues in Risk Management and Challenges Ahead” IMF working paper WP/02/192

Financial Risk Management

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION
The focus in this subject is on providing protection against portfolio, financial and corporate risks that are common to any number of basic and advanced investment decisions. Topics covered include risk insurance; the function of a risk management program to satisfy shareholders, employees, regulators, and other important stakeholders; the continuing evolution of best practice risk policies. methodologies and associated risk infrastructures; implementation and the efficient communication of an organisation-wide Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) approach that encompasses market, credit, liquidity, operational, legal and regulatory, business, strategic and reputational risks.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On successful completion of this subject, the student will be able to:

1) Justify why businesses need to undertake risk management and assess risk tolerances.
2) Derive an appropriate risk management practice for a business.
3) Identify the characteristics and discuss the strategies for management of major risks encountered in business.
4) Apply appropriate risk management standards to different businesses.
5) Explain orally and in writing the concepts of risk management.
6) Apply hedging to corporate and investment risks.

REQUIRED TEXTS

Hull, J.C.: Risk Management and Financial Institutions, 4rd ed.,
Pearson International Edition, Boston et al. 2012 (ISBN 13: 978-1-118-95594-9).

RECOMMENDED READINGS

1) Jorion, Financial Risk Manager Handbook, Sixth (6th) Edition; Wiley Finance, 2011:

2) J. C. Hulll, 2009, 7th Edition, “Options, Futures and other Derivatives”, Prentice Hall.

3) Iqbal & Abbas. “An Introduction to Islamic Finance: Theory and Practice, 2011, WILEY, 2nd Edition, ISBN: 978-0-470-82808-3 (selected parts).

4) Sundararajan, V. ; Errico, Luca , 2002, “Islamic Financial Institutions and Products in the Global Financial System: Key Issues in Risk Management and Challenges Ahead” IMF working paper WP/02/192.

Banks’ Lending and Securities

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION
This subject examines the bank’s lending process and the securities associated with it. This subject includes comprehensive discussion on issues concerning lending within the banking environment, including regulation of security offerings, principles of good lending, documents involved in lending, lending and the consumer credit code, new developments in lending and securities and their impact on the banking sector.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this subject, the student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of:
1. Appraise the impact of lending and securities market on credit management by banks both within the Australian and International context.
2. Analyse financial information for origination, assessment, documentation, management and supervision of loans and securities.
3. Analyse the issues relating to the compliance with regulation, credit codes and the relevant legal framework in the lending management of banks.
4. Evaluate the effect of social, economic, political and cultural factors on the lending operations and risk management of banks.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Milind Sathye, James Bartle, and Raymond Boffey, Credit Analysis & Lending Management, Third Edition, Tilde Publishing and Distribution, 2013.

RECOMMENDED READINGS Books
1. Milind Sathye, James Bartle, Michael Vincent, and Raymond Boffey, Credit Analysis & Lending Management , John Wiley & Sons Australia Ltd., 2003.
The old edition of the textbook can be accessed electronically through the following link:
http://iii.library.uow.edu.au/search~S0?/pSaedvandi%2C+Ali/psaedvandi+ali/-3%2C-1%2C0%2CB/frameset&FF=psaedvandi+ali&1%2C1%2C
2. Hong Kong Institute of Bankers, Bank Lending, Wiley, 2012
3. Michael, K Ong, Internal Credit Risk Models: Capital Allocation and Performance Measurement, Risk Books, 1999.
4 Reto Gallati, Risk Management and Capital Adequacy, McGraw-Hill, 2003.
5. Brueggeman, W.B. & J.D. Fisher, Real Estate Finance and Investments, McGraw Hill Irwin, 2008,.
6. Weaver, PM, Banking and Lending Practice, 4th Edition, Lawbook Company, 2001.
Weerasooria, WS Bank Lending and Securities in Australia, Butterworths, 1998.

Financial Strategy

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION
The global impact of banking is the focus of this subject. The subject entails comprehensive discussions on issues that are commonly involved within the international banking environment.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this subject, the student should be able to:

1. Recognize the importance of international operations of the banks for their impact on the global economy.
2. To demonstrate an understanding of the various methods of payments involved in the settlement of international transactions, the role of banks in facilitating those transactions and various issues connected with them.
3. Develop a sound understanding of theoretical and applied issues in international banking and expertise in the relevant empirical skills to undertake analysis of problems encountered in real-life situations.
4. Analyze and assess the institutional framework and operations of international banks, international lending techniques and associated financial instruments.
5. Demonstrate an understanding of the foreign exchange markets within the banking environment.
6. Synthesize the various types of risks that the banks face in their international operations.
7. Compare and contrast the various types of regulatory regimes in which the banks conduct their international operations.
8. Assess the impact of deregulation on the international operations of global banks.
9. Analyze the new developments taking place in the international banking environment.

REQUIRED TEXTS
1. Hughes & Macdonald, “International Banking: Text and Cases”, Pearson Education, 2002. (HM)

2. Anthony Saunders & Marcia Millon Cornett, “Financial Institutions Management: A Risk Management Approach” McGraw-Hill International Edition, Sixth edition, 2008. (CS)

RECOMMENDED READINGS Books
1. Milind Sathye, James Bartle, Michael Vincent, and Raymond Boffey “Credit Analysis & Lending Management ” John Wiley & Sons Australia Ltd., 2003. (SBVB)
2. Michael P. Malloy, International Banking: Second Edition Supplements, Carolina Academic Press, Durham, 2008.
3. Ingo Walters and Roy C. Smith, Global Banking, Oxford University Press, 2003.
4. Ingo Walters and Roy C. Smith, Global Capital Markets and Banking, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1999.
5. A. W. Mullineux , Victor Murinde, Handbook Of International Banking, Edward Elgar Pub, 2005.
6. Dileep Mehta and Hung-Gay Fung, International Bank Management, Wiley-Blackwell, 2004.
7. K. Thomas Liaw, The Business of Investment Banking: A Comprehensive Overview, Wiley, 2005.
8. Peter K. Oppenheim, Global Banking, American Bankers Association, 1999.
9. Michael P. Malloy, International Banking: Cases, materials and problems, Carolina Academic Press, Durham, 2005.
10. Mullineux W Andrew and Victor Murinde , Hand book of International Banking ,Edward Elgar ,USA, 2003.

Banking Theory and Practice

SUBJECT DESCRIPTION

This subject examines bank management theory as applied to the practice of bank operations within the banking sector. It entails comprehensive discussion on issues that are commonly involved within the banking environment such as the regulatory structure, risk management, commercial and consumer lending, capital adequacy analysis, banking financial futures and forwards, the cheque clearing system and the latest information technology within the banking world.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this subject, the student should be able to:

1. Appraise the role of a modern bank within the Australian and International context;
2. Discuss and illustrate the key functions of banks with particular emphasis in areas such as lending practice, the various risks encountered and overall regulatory framework;
3. Demonstrate an understanding of liability and liquidity management and capital adequacy of the banks;
4. Demonstrate an understanding of various interest rate risk models;
5. Demonstrate an understanding of future and forwards, interest rate options, swaps and country risk evaluation used in banks;
6. Demonstrate an understanding of the cheque clearing system and new developments in banking technology over a period of time;
7. Demonstrate an understanding of commercial and consumer lending practices.

REQUIRED TEXTS
Anthony Saunders & Marcia Millon Cornett, “Financial Institutions Management: A Risk Management Approach” McGraw-Hill International Edition, Eighth edition, 2014. (SC)

RECOMMENDED READINGS Books

1. Hogan W., et al. “Management of Financial Institutions” , 2/E , John Wiley & Sons Australia, 2004 (H)
2. Bessis, Joel, Risk Management in Banking, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2002.
3. Brown, A. J. F., et al., International Banking and Finance, Serendipity Publications, 1989.
4. Choudhry, M., Bank Asset and Liability Management: Strategy, Trading and Analysis, 1st Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2007.
5. Hempel, George H. and Donald Simonson, Bank Management: Text and Cases, 4th Edition, John Wiley & Sons.
6. Matten, C., Managing Bank Capital: Capital Allocation and Performance Measurement, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons.
7. Hull, John C., Risk Management and Financial Institutions, Pearson, 2007.
8. Rose, Peter. S., Commercial Bank Management, 5th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2002.
9. Rose, Peter S. and Sylvia C. Hudgins, Bank Management and Financial Services, International 6th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2005.
10. Saunders, Anthony, Financial Institutions Management: A Modern Perspective, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill.
11. Weaver, P. M. and C. D. Kingsley, Banking & Lending Practice, 4th Edition, Law Book Company, A Thomson Company, 2001.
12. Gup B.E., Avram A., Beal D., Lambert R., Kolari J., “Commercial Banking: The Management of Risk”, 1st Edition, John Wiley and Sons Australia Ltd. Australian edition, 2007.
13. Koch T.W. and Macdonald S.S., “Bank Management”, 6th Edition, Thomson, Australia, 2006.
14. Lange H., Saunders A., Anderson J.A., Thomson D. and Cornett M.M., “Financial Institutions Management”, 2nd Edition, McGraw Hill Irwin, Australia, 2007.

Publications

Arsh Star Seeks Working Capital

“Saedvandi, Ali; Arsh Star,” 2010, a case on working capital management for an importer/distributor of tea products in the UAE.

Saedvandi Protective Capital and Poverty Trap

Saedvandi, Ali, 2012, “Protective Capital and Poverty Trap,” in T. Hoque (eds), Proceedings of Global Accounting, Finance and Economics Conference, World Business Institute Australia, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 1-22.

The Dynamic Interaction of Growth and Depreciation

Saedvandi, Ali;The Dynamic Interactions of Growth and Depreciation,” 2014

Fuzzy Estimation of Comprehensive Depreciation Indicators for 21 Developing Countries

Saedvandi, Ali; Hossein Sadeghi, Zahra Keshavarzi, 2014 “Fuzzy Estimation of Combined Depreciation Index for Selected Developing Countries,” Iranian Journal of Economic Research, 18: 56 p. 95-221

Fixed Payment Partnership Instrument

Saedvandi, Ali; Fixed Payment Partnership Instrument: A solution towards convergence of practicality and morality,” 2015.

Awards & Achievements

  1. Nominated for Best Teaching Award UOWD, 2014
  2.  Second Best Case Writing Award UOWD, Jan 2010
  3. Best Faculty Contributor to the Library Award UOWD, Sep 2009
  4. Kufa Scholarship Roanoke-VA USA, 2002
  5. Award of Research in Planning and Development in 1998 and again in 1999, for obtaining best positions in the systems engineering master’s program
  6. Award of Ministry of Science 1991, for earning the best position in the university entrance exams